How Pollution and Hydrology Work

September 7, 2015

This video gives you a quick look at how the dual/interacting systems work.  Water seeps into surrounding ground, irrigating lands and spreading in 3 dimensions.  You can view it with a hydrology meter tool, and use that as you work to get the right amount of irrigation to farm land, digging canals to do so.

On top of that is the pollution simulation.  From this refinery here you can see a mound of pollution being generated, that’s mining tailings, the waste ore after extracting the minerals.  If it’s left exposed to the elements like this, runoff from rain will pollute the surrounding environment.

You can see it seeping into the water supply as well, changing it to a pinkish brown.  This can have a huge impact on the surrounding plant and animal life, and players will need to make plans to contain or bury waste efficiently in order to generate enough minerals without destroying the surrounding area.

The Eco Team is a collection of introverted and sometimes genius programmers/designers based in Seattle and Australia. We all grew up and thrive in the video game culture, so of course making them is our dream job. We look forward to continuing to put out quality games for the community of players.

3 thoughts

  • Reply
    Wieslaw Lichacz

    Great question from Alistair Leith … The Kakadu example is a good real time yardstick for scientific, environmental, Indigenous and social impact authenticity. The current nattle to avert a national disaster at Oroville Dam spillway failures in California, a state that is in top ten ind GDP if it was considered a nation. I lead evidence to the Ranger Uranium Environmental Inquiry in 1976 that the design of their tailings dam could fail in extreme weather events citing the Viont Dam disaster that wiped 3 towns off the map in Italy in the early 70’s . In that case farmets noticed cows moving away from the waterlogged reservoir edges. Engineers watching the dam reach full capacity ignored these obsetvations saying they trusted the full concrete wall to hold. It did but a number of mudslide abalances in the waterlogged catchment created a tsunami wave that over topped the dam causing the destruction of towns many kilometers downstream. The Ranger mine operators put in acidic tailings that destroyed parts of the clay blanket that was supposed to hold the wet tailings to prent drying out in dry seasons causing serious radiation and dust hazards. By the way, the Inquiry recommended 2 metres of water over the tailings to prevent tis and an impervious membrane to prevent seepage. The government of the day rejected these recommendations and we ended up with the local government approving a dry tailings situation that is very hazardous to health. If this living example is not comlicated enough, then have you considered simulating the global climate models into this ecosytem?

  • Reply
    Alastair Leith

    Nice water rendering!

    Tailings are often in ponds/dams, and when ponds/dams overflow like they do at the Ranger uranium mine it sends a large amount of heavy metals and isotopes into the water ways. In the case of Ranger, it flows into the Kakadu World Heritage Site and National Park. Will Eco have weather effects and will tailings go into dams at some point.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <strike> <strong>